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How can German citizens apply for Thailand visa? When is the best time to visit the country? How to find the best flight to Thailand? Where to visit? or which tour packages will suit you most? Everything can be found below.

Thailand TRAVEL TIPS FOR "GERMAN CITIZENS"

Best time to visit Thailand

Although the climate varies throughout Thailand, you can visit all year round. The best time to travel is during the cool and dry season between November and early April.

In the south, the climate differs between the eastern and western coasts. The west coast is more favorable during the winter months, when diving and snorkeling will be at its best. The weather on the east coast is good for most of the year, with the lowest rainfall in January and February and the highest in November.

You can check the detailed guide to know exactly where and when to go in Thailand throughout the year.

Thailand Tourist Visa Policy for German Citizens

As one of Countries listed for Visa Exemption and Visa on Arrival, German Passport Holders are not required to obtain a visa when entering Thailand for tourism purposes and will be permitted to stay in Thailand for a period not exceeding 30 days on each visit. (15-day stays if arriving by land-crossing). The period of stay may not be extended.

Upon arrival, those entering Thailand under the Tourist Visa Exemption scheme may be required to show the documents below at the port of entry:

  • Proof of adequate finances for the duration of stay in Thailand i.e. traveler’s cheque or cash equivalent to 10,000 Baht per person and 20,000 Baht per family.
  • Proof of onward travel (confirmed air, train, bus or boat tickets) to leave Thailand within 30 days of the arrival date.

German Passport Holders who are planning to stay in Thailand as tourists for a longer period specified above must obtain a tourist visa before entering Thailand. Travelers entering Thailand for purposes other than tourism need to apply for visa of the specific type.

NOTICE: Travelers are also advised to check if he/she would need to carry International Health Certificate for Yellow Fever Vaccination to enter Thailand

Plan a longer journey? Check out the guide for Thailand tourist visa policy

How much does it cost to travel to Thailand from Germany?

For the flight cost, check the information below in this article (Getting to Thailand from Germany)

Our recommended spending for your journey in Thailand is about $120-150/person/day (group of 2 people). Of course, you can either spend less at about $90-100/person/day (even $30-40/day - backpacker style) or you can spend much higher depending on the services you expect on spot.

Here is our detailed guide for Budget & Currency for travelling in Thailand

Getting to Thailand from Germany

You can find the flights to Thailand from some popular airports in Germany including Munich (MUC), Frankfurt (FRA), Berlin (BER) or Dusseldorf (DUS)

Thailand has two international airports in Bangkok – Don Mueang International Airport (DMK) and Suvarnabhumi International Airport (BKK) – and as these are located in the centre of the country, they provide a good starting point to explore north and south. If you wish to go to the north of the country, consider booking a flight to Chiang Mai International Airport (CNX), while if you would like to visit the south, then Phuket International Airport (HKT) is a good option.

Visitors who would like to do some island hopping while in Thailand should consider booking a flight into Krabi Airport (KBV). Krabi is an ideal place to base yourself in order to visit the many islands in the area and is well-connected with flights to and from Bangkok airports.

If you are looking at flights to Thailand in order to visit some of the attractions in the north-east of the country on the border with Laos, why not think about booking a connecting flight from Bangkok to Udon Thani International Airport (UTH), which serves as a hub for this region. Udon Thani International Airport only operates domestic flights, so you will need to fly in from one of the main airports in Bangkok or Chiang Mai.

The U-Tapao Rayong Pattaya International Airport (UTP) in the Rayong province is a good airport to consider flying into if you want to spend your holiday on the island of Kho Samet. You will need to book a connecting flight from Bangkok or Phuket to Rayong.

Flight FAQs

Q. When is the best time to book flights to Thailand?

Aim to have your flight tickets secured at least four months in advance to give yourself a chance of finding the cheapest flights to Thailand. If you can then book them even further ahead, especially if your dates coincide with a major event or the peak season. 

Once you’ve narrowed down your destination by choosing a city, usually either Bangkok or Chiang Mai, you’ll be able to figure out what dates offer the cheapest flights to Thailand and go from there. 

Flexibility is the key to securing discounted flight tickets so if you’re not governed by a particular set of weeks or to a specific location then you’ll give yourself the best chances of finding the cheapest flights to Thailand. 

Don’t worry too much about which side of the plane to sit on as each has their benefits and offer equally impressive view through your flight.

Q. How long is the flight to Thailand?

For flights from the Germany to Thailand, the most common direct route is from Franfurt to Bangkok which takes around 11 hours covering the distance of about 5,466 miles or 8,796 kilometers, and lands at Suvarnabhumi Airport.

Q. Which airlines operate direct flights to Thailand?

Lufthansa or Thai Airways all operate direct flights between Frankfurt (FRA) and Suvarnabhumi International Airport in Bangkok. From here you can catch connecting flights to other international and regional airports in Thailand.

Q. Where should I fly if I’m visiting Phuket beaches and Thailand’s islands?

Phuket Island does have its own international airport. Phuket International Airport (HKT) is at the very north of the island, about 1h from the city of Phuket. However, it can be expensive to fly to Phuket, so many tourists travelling on a budget fly into Bangkok and take public transport to Phuket. 

From Phuket, you can take a boat to many of the most popular islands such as Ko Phi Phi, the Similan Islands, or the Racha islands. 

Keep in mind, however, that this is more than a 10h journey.

Q. Where should I fly to in Thailand if I’d like to visit the northern part of the country?

If you want to skip Bangkok and visit Thailand's north, including the "Golden Triangle" region near the borders with Laos and Myanmar, consider flying into Chiang Mai International Airport (CNX). 

However, it can be expensive to fly to Chiang Mai, so many tourists travelling on a budget fly into Bangkok and take another budget domestic flight to Chiang Mai.

Q. How much does it cost to fly to Thailand?

The price ticket ranges from $350 to $750 depending on your flight route and date.

We recommend using some online ticket booking platform (Kayak, Cheapflights, or SkyScanner) to look for the cheapest flight possible according to your travel plan. They do have alert system when there is the price change on your travel date

Here is how to get the cheapest flight possible to Thailand

Getting around in Thailand

You’ll find a real gamut of transportation options in Thailand, from Bangkok’s modern Skytrain system to tuk-tuks, with plenty of options in between. While the traffic in Bangkok can be wretched, rural areas still offer generally good roads with zero snarl. So be flexible, and hop the tuk-tuk, subway, taxi, ferry, bus, train or plane that will best get you where you want to go. There’s plenty to explore!

Check How to get around in Thailand here

Other FAQs

1. Do I need vaccines for Thailand?

Yes, some vaccines are recommended or required for Thailand. The CDC and WHO recommend the following vaccinations for Thailand: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid, cholera, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, meningitis, polio, measles, mumps and rubella (MMR), Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis), chickenpox, shingles, pneumonia and influenza

Here is the article for recommended vaccinations for Thailand.

2. How safe is Thailand?

Thailand is generally a safe country to visit, but it's smart to exercise caution, especially when it comes to dealing with strangers (both Thai and foreigners) and travelling alone.

  • Assault of travellers is relatively rare in Thailand, but it does happen.
  • Possession of drugs can result in a year or more of prison time. Drug smuggling carries considerably higher penalties, including execution.
  • Disregard all offers of free shopping or sightseeing help from strangers. These are scams that invariably take a commission from your purchases.

Here is our guide for Safety and Precautions in Thailand

3. Do I need a travel insurance for Thailand?

The answer is a very loud YES. Protect yourself against the cost of medical care, missed connections, lost or stolen items and other common travel annoyances.

Be sure that your policy covers ambulances or an emergency flight home. Some policies specifically exclude ‘dangerous activities’, which can include scuba diving, motorcycling and even trekking. A locally acquired motorcycle licence is not valid under some policies. You may prefer a policy that pays doctors or hospitals directly rather than you having to pay on the spot and claim later. If you have to claim later, make sure you keep all documentation.

Check the detailed article for Thailand travel insurance here

4. What should I take to Thailand?

Here are some essential items to consider for your trip to Thailand:

  • Slip-on Shoes are best, especially if you’re planning to travel to many temples. You will need to take your shoes off quite frequently.
  • Bug spray to ward off mosquitoes that could be carrying disease.
  • Shops in Thailand have sunscreen, but your options are limited.
  • If you’re planning on visiting temples, buy clothing items that cover your shoulders, knees and ankles.

Here is the detailed guide for what to pack for Thailand

5. Are you supposed to tip in Thailand?

Tipping is NOT customary in Thailand, there is absolutely NO mandatory requirement to tip anyone, but small gratuities for great service are very much appreciated. Unlike some other parts of the world, you will never see a Thai service provider with his hand out waiting for a tip.

Check out the Thailand tipping guide & other local etiquettes here

6. Do I need to buy a Thailand SIM Card? And where can I buy it?

It is recommended to buy a local SIM card why travelling in Thailand as it surely has a stable connection and also the cheaper price for calling & data usage.

You can buy the SIM Card almost everywhere in Thailand, especially inside the big cities like Bangkok, Chiang Mai, or Phuket

Check out the detailed guide for Internet & phone in Thailand here

7. Do I need to bargain while shopping in Thailand?

Bargaining and haggling for a better deal is all part of the experience when shopping at markets in Bangkok. The first price offered is rarely the true price, especially in overly tourist areas like Khao San Road, Silom, Chatuchak Market, or the stalls around Nana BTS Station. 

Tips: 

  • Remember that while bargaining is common in markets, it is not accepted or possible in convenience stores like 7-Eleven or upscale shopping malls.
  • Look around and check with your guide to have the idea of what you are going to buy. 

Here is our guide for Buying and bargaining in Thailand

German Embassy in Thailand

It is good to know the address of your embassy beforehand, so that you know exactly where to go and call when you need it.

German Embassy Bangkok

  • Address: 9 South Sathorn Road - Bangkok 10120 - G.P.O. Box 2595 - Bangkok 10500 - Thailand
  • Telephone: (+66) 2 287 90 00
  • Fax: (+66) 2 287 17 76
  • Email: [email protected]
  • Website: www.bangkok.diplo.de

Opening hours: (Local time)

  • Mon-Thu: 07.00-15.30 Fri: 07.00-13.00

Thailand TOUR PACKAGES FOR "GERMAN CITIZENS"

Hills to Coast Thailand Explorer Hills to Coast Thailand Explorer

- Thailand -

Hills to Coast Thailand Explorer
Trek & Hike / 21 days / fr. $2,730

From the mountains to the sea, take the family on an adventurous holiday in Thailand covering multiple sports such as hiking, biking and kayaking. Begin at historically rich Kanchanaburi, hike the... More

Thailand Northern Loop Thailand Northern Loop

- Thailand -

Thailand Northern Loop
Unseen / 12 days / fr. $1,560

Hit the road for a journey through Thailand’s north, a region of spectacular natural landscapes and intriguing cultures. Take a boat trip along the Golden Triangle and go caving near Pai. Mee... More

Enchanting Thailand Enchanting Thailand

- Thailand -

Enchanting Thailand
Must-see / 13 days / fr. $1,690

This adventure focuses in on northern Thailand, one of the Kingdom’s most magical regions. After starting out in Bangkok, guests head north via the ancient capitals of Ayutthaya and Sukhothai... More

Essential Thailand Essential Thailand

- Thailand -

Essential Thailand
Must-see / 12 days / fr. $1,440

Welcome to Thailand- a land of rich history, incredible culture, friendly people, and some of the world’s best food. See the country’s iconic sites and experience deep-rooted traditions... More

Thailand Family Jungle & Island Adventure Thailand Family Jungle & Island Adventure

- Thailand -

Thailand Family Jungle & Island Adventure
Family / 18 days / fr. $2,340

Thailand has long been a highly popular destination for families, understandably given its friendly, welcoming reputation coupled with fascinating culture and fantastic food. This three-week trip i... More

Isaan Insight: The Combination of Khmer & Thai Culture Isaan Insight: The Combination of Khmer & Thai Culture

- Thailand -

Isaan Insight: The Combination of Khmer & Thai Culture
Unseen / 10 days / fr. $1,200

Get off the tourist trail with an overland adventure through Thailand’s Isaan province. Travel from Bangkok to Sukhothai, and all places in between. Marvel at prehistoric wall paintings, come... More

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Check below our detailed tips & guide for every places to visit in Thailand, recommendation regarding the inclusion in each theme you prefer, and what you can do based on the time frame you have.

PLACES TO VISIT IN Thailand
Bangkok
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Chiang Mai
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Phuket
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Hua Hin
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Chiang Rai
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Koh Samui
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Thailand PLANS BY TRAVEL THEME
Must-see
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Check out all the must-see places and things to do & see

Luxury
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Unique experience combined with top-notch services

Wellness & Leisure
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Easy excursion combined with week-long beach break

Honeymoon
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Easy excursions combined with unique experience making the long-lasting romantic memories

Family
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The combination of fun and educational activities

Trek & Hike
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Explore the least visited destinations and unknown experience on foot

Unseen
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Reveal off-the-beatentrack routes, least explored destinations, and unknown tribe groups

Cycling
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Explore every corners of the destination on two wheels

Cruise
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The combination of some must-see experience and the cruise tour along the mighty rivers

Thailand PLANS BY TIME FRAME
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Thailand BLOG ARTICLES

As some of you may have seen in the news, Thailand is gearing up for a ‘soft reopening’ to vaccinated travellers a month from now on July 1.

It is official, sort of. After months of kicking sand around debating if it will really happen, the Centre for Economic Situation Administration (CESA) has officially approved the Phuket Sandbox plan, an important step forward. The announcement, made late this afternoon, June, 4th, appears to answer the often-posed question if the sandbox plan would ever happen after the much more intense and deadly third wave of Covid-19 swept through Thailand.
Then, the island will be opening Phuket International Airport to foreign travellers as proposed by the Tourism Authority of Thailand.

The trial will be the first of its kind in the country, and if successful, may be rolled out across other parts of Thailand. The Thailand Authority of Tourism (TAT) has already earmarked Krabi, Pattaya, Bangkok, Buriram, Cha-am, Koh Samui, Phang-nga and Hua Hin as possible destinations to try out the scheme.

Each model will be slightly different, depending on geography, and international visitors will still have to get a visa in advance and fill out some paperwork (see details below). Nevertheless, this will come as promising news to those travellers desperate to visit Thailand!

If the Phuket Sandbox Scheme goes ahead, from June to September 2021, Thailand is expecting to receive up to 129,000 international visitors – will you be one of them? In this article, we’ll attempt to answer all of the questions you might have about the Phuket Sandbox and more!

Disclaimer – Information regarding the Phuket Sandbox Program is changing literally every day and is dependent on the COVID-19 situation across Thailand. While we update this article regularly to the best of our ability, we cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions.

Learn more about our travel guide for Phuket island here

...more

Also known as the Nine Emperor Gods Festival or the Kin Jay Festival, the Phuket Vegetarian Festival is an annual event celebrated primarily by the Chinese community in Thailand and throughout Southeast Asia.

Running for nine days, the vegetarian festival in Phuket is considered by many to be the most extreme and bizarre of festivals in Thailand. The Phuket Vegetarian Festival could be Thailand's answer to the Tamil festival of Thaipusam celebrated in neighboring Malaysia. Devotees not only adopt a special diet for the holiday, a select few participants prove their devotion by practicing self-mutilation.

Some of the feats performed include piercing cheeks with swords, walking on nails or hot coals, and climbing ladders made of knife blades! Most participants miraculously heal up without needing stitches or medical care.

WARNING! The content and the images are not recommended for the faint of heart! Consider before continuing.

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Buddhist Lent Day (Thailand Wan Khao Phansa, Laos Boun Khao Phansa) is the start of the three-month period during the rainy season when monks are required to remain in a particular place such as a monastery or temple grounds. Here, they will meditate, pray, study, and teach other young monks. In the past, monks were not even allowed to leave the temple, but today, most monks just refrain from traveling during this period. You will still see them out during the day.

It is said that monks started remaining immobile in a temple during this time because they wanted to avoid killing insects and harming farmland. Apparently, traveling monks were crossing through fields, thus destroying the crops of villagers and farmers. After catching wind of this, Buddha decided that in order to avoid damaging crops, hurting insects, or harming themselves during the rainy season, monks should remain in their temples during these three months.

Tired of reading, listen to our podcast below:

...more

The Hmong New Year celebration is a cultural tradition that takes place annually in select areas where large Hmong communities exist and in a modified form where smaller communities come together. During the New Year's celebration, Hmong dress in traditional clothing and enjoy Hmong traditional foods, dance, music, bull fights, and other forms of entertainment. Hmong New Year celebrations have Hmong ethnic traditions and culture and may also serve to educate those who have an interest in Hmong tradition. Hmong New Year celebrations frequently occur in November and December (traditionally at the end of the harvest season when all work is done), serving as a Thanksgiving holiday for the Hmong people.

...more

Thailand never fails to amaze its thousands of visitors with the most vibrant festivals that are sure to delight them by offering glimpses into the heritage and traditions of the country. Each month offers an exciting opportunity to be a part of these festivals. From kids to adults and old-aged people, locals have the time of their lives during these festivities. Considered to be one of the best ways to relish a memorable time in what is already known as an incredible country, these festivals in Thailand are the most popular ones to be a part of.

...more

Magha Puja (also written as Makha Bucha Day) is the third most important Buddhist festival, celebrated on the full moon day of the third lunar month in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Sri Lanka and on the full moon day of Tabaung in Myanmar. It celebrates a gathering that was held between the Buddha and 1,250 of his first disciples, which, according to tradition, preceded the custom of periodic recitation of discipline by monks.

On the day, Buddhists celebrate the creation of an ideal and exemplary community, which is why it is sometimes called Saṅgha Day, the Saṅgha referring to the Buddhist community, and for some Buddhist schools this is specifically the monastic community. In Thailand, the Pāli term Māgha-pūraṇamī is also used for the celebration, meaning 'to honor on the full moon of the third lunar month'.

Finally, some authors referred to the day as the Buddhist All Saints Day. 

In pre-modern times, Magha Puja has been celebrated by some Southeast Asian communities. But it became widely popular in the modern period, when it was instituted in Thailand by King Rama IV in the mid-19th century. From Thailand, it spread to other South and Southeast Asian countries. Presently, it is a public holiday in some of these countries.

It is an occasion when Buddhists go to the temple to perform merit-making activities, such as alms giving, meditation and listening to teachings. It has been proposed in Thailand as a more spiritual alternative to the celebration of Valentine's Day.

...more
CHECK OUT OTHER DESTINATIONS
Vietnam
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A land of staggering natural beauty and cultural complexities, of dynamic megacities and hill-tribe villages, Vietnam is both exotic and compelling.
Cambodia
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There's a magic about this charming yet confounding kingdom that casts a spell on visitors. In Cambodia, ancient and modern worlds collide to create an authentic adventure.
Myanmar
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It's a new era for this extraordinary and complex land, where the landscape is scattered with gilded pagodas and the traditional ways of Asia endure.
Laos
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Vivid nature, voluptuous landscapes and a vibrant culture collide with a painful past and optimistic future to make Laos an enigmatic experience for the adventurous.
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