Your tailor-made tours specialist in Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Myanmar & Laos

Responsible travel

Since the very beginning, we have always cared about developing a sustainable tourism and do our best daily to organize tours taking into account the economic, social and environmental aspects.

SUSTAINABILITY IN ACTION

We have taken many actions so far to make a positive impact in the environments we operate in. Our sustainability policy is now well integrated and focuses around 4 axes :

Foster cultural interaction

We do our best to foster communication and involve the local communities in our activities. We try to facilitate cultural exchange and authentic meetings.

Support local charity

We are participating in several projects in remote and disadvantaged areas, to support small infrastructure construction or help kids in medical emergency.

Reduce environmental footprints

We take actions to minimize our impact on the nature and environment, through eco-friendly  transportation or waste recycling for instance.

Support ethical partners

We make sure that all our stakeholders follow the same sustainable practices. We also favor partners that are committed in ethical projects such as fairtrade shops.

A MUTUAL BENEFICIAL TOURISM

We have committed ourselves to develop a more local and responsible tourism for several reasons.

A better community for residents

The money that tourists spend can be reinvested in local economies, from public services to education.

Did you know that for every $1 generated in direct Travel & Tourism GDP, more than $2 are generated on an indirect and/or induced basis

Lots of jobs

Tourism is a sector that is all about people - and as such is an incredible driver of job creation from big cities to small local communities.

Did you know that in 2019 the sector employed 1 in 10 people on the planet and it created 1 in 4 of all new jobs globally in the last 5 years

More creative and entrepreneurial

Tourism’s positive ripple effect not only helps support local businesses but fosters entrepreneurship and new business ventures.

Did you know that 80% of the sector is composed of SMEs

Opportunities for all

Tourism offers opportunities to people from all walks of life, supporting vulnerable groups, including minorities, youth and women among others.

Did you know that the tourism sector has almost twice as many women employers as other sectors and employs a higher share of youth than the overall economy

More peaceful and more tolerant

Tourism is a driver for peace. It helps promote tolerance between people as they learn and better understand each other’s cultures.

Did you know that countries that have more open and sustainable tourism sectors will likely enjoy higher levels of positive peace in the future

Preserving heritage

Tourism can help protect and finance the preservation of historic and cultural sites, and even prompt the creation of new community initiatives.

Did you know that 40% of travellers identify as cultural tourists?

Preserving the wildlife we love

Tourism can help protect and revitalise wildlife through preservation programmes against illegal poaching and creates conservation jobs

Did you know that the total economic contribution of wildlife tourism amounted to $344 billion in 2018, equivalent to the entire GDP of South Africa or Hong Kong

Fueling the adoption of sustainable tech

Tourism helps accelerate the integration of innovative technologies, which can facilitate your everyday activities while enhancing sustainability and creating more touchless experiences.

Did you know that 66% of consumers are using less cash and moving toward more contactless solutions in the wake of COVID-19

WHAT CAN YOU DO?
Thinking of doing something to support the responsible tourism? Do not think of something big, just start with something small and realistic. Our mother Theresa said: "Not all of us can do great things, but we can do small things with great love." Here is the list of what you can do to fulfill your part.
Sustainable Tourism Alternatives
bee-white Sustainable Tourism Alternatives

There are alternatives we can opt for when we plan our trips that ease the burden on congested tourist destinations.

(1) Travel in the Off-Season

(2) Stay Outside the City Centre

(3) Research Eco-Friendly Services in the Area

Go Green at Your Hotel
bee-white Go Green at Your Hotel

The chance to go green starts with your hotel. If you are staying longer than a day or two, ask them not to change your sheets and towels every day. Similarly, turn off air conditioners, heaters, and other electronic gadgets when you go out. Better still, stay in hotels that have recycling programs in place and abide by their guidelines.

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint
bee-white Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

One key step in promoting sustainable tourism is reducing your carbon footprint. There are plenty of green tips to offset your carbon footprint such as taking direct flights, buying organic, local products from grocery stores and farmer's markets.

Say NO to Illegal Trade
bee-white Say NO to Illegal Trade

Buy from local businesses so you circulate money in the local economy and create jobs for local people. Patronize businesses that are not engaged in illegal trade, the exploitation of humans (especially children) and the looting of artifacts.

Take Care of Heritage Places
bee-white Take Care of Heritage Places

Heritage sites you visit are likely visited by millions of other people a year, so care needs to be taken to allow others to enjoy them as well. Take your litter with you and for heaven's sake, don't graffiti! Do you absolutely have to take that picture of yourself on top of a monument especially when the signs say "NO"?

Challenge Yourself to Step Outside Your Comfort Zone
bee-white Challenge Yourself to Step Outside Your Comfort Zone

Often, we go on cushy guided tours and retreat to our hotels for meals. Instead, you should walk around the nearby areas, eat at local restaurants, or talk with local peoples. Challenge yourself. Taking a step beyond your comfort zone each time you take a trip is worthwhile. You will be surprised at the rich treasures stored in your memory.

Support Community-Based Initiatives and Tourism
bee-white Support Community-Based Initiatives and Tourism

Dining with local families, spending the night at a local home, or joining the farming activities are some examples of what you can support the local communities. Communities have a stake in the development of tourism in their areas, so their active involvement will ensure that programs will be sustained.

Respect the Practices of Local People
bee-white Respect the Practices of Local People

Be discreet when people are praying in churches, mosques or temples, and if you choose to visit any of these places, wear appropriate clothing. On top of abiding by the dress code, be sure to respect the silence and the restrictions placed on these sites. If you see a pile of shoes outside the entrance, take your own off too. Don't be a doofus . . . think!

Use Reusable Bags
bee-white Use Reusable Bags

This is just a simple thing to do, but it eliminates the plastic bags that pollute the environment and create eyesores such as roadside fences completely covered in plastic bags.

NOT READY YET?

We believe you have the right to arm yourselves with as much information as possible before making any decision.

Check below the detailed information for our different destinations, our plans by travel theme or time frame to learn more before moving forward...

OUR DESTINATIONS
Vietnam
bee-white Vietnam

A land of staggering natural beauty and cultural complexities, of dynamic megacities and hill-tribe villages, Vietnam is both exotic and compelling.

Thailand
bee-white Thailand

Friendly and food-obsessed, hedonistic and historic, cultured and curious, Thailand tempts visitors with a smile as golden as the country's glittering temples and tropical beaches.

Cambodia
bee-white Cambodia

There's a magic about this charming yet confounding kingdom that casts a spell on visitors. In Cambodia, ancient and modern worlds collide to create an authentic adventure.

Myanmar
bee-white Myanmar

It's a new era for this extraordinary and complex land, where the landscape is scattered with gilded pagodas and the traditional ways of Asia endure.

Laos
bee-white Laos

Vivid nature, voluptuous landscapes and a vibrant culture collide with a painful past and optimistic future to make Laos an enigmatic experience for the adventurous.

PLANS BY TRAVEL THEME
Must-see
Honeymoon
Trek & Hike
Wellness & Leisure
bee-white Wellness & Leisure
PLANS BY TIME FRAME
white-icon About 1 week
white-icon About 2 weeks
white-icon About 3 weeks
white-icon About 4 weeks
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TRAVEL TIPS & GUIDE

Either are you wondering about best time to visit, visa policy, or how to get the cheapest flight, we have your back!

WHAT MORE? Choose the country you plan to visit, then search for your nationality below to see our special travel tips & advice for your country. CONTACT US if you cannot find yours.

Destinations

Best Time to Visit
bee-white Best Time to Visit
Tourist Visa Policy
bee-white Tourist Visa Policy
Getting Flight There
bee-white Getting Flight There
Getting Around
Vaccinations
Internet & Phone
bee-white Internet & Phone
Packing List
Budget & Currency
bee-white Budget & Currency
Buying & Bargaining
bee-white Buying & Bargaining
Safety & Precautions
bee-white Safety & Precautions
Tipping Customs
Local Etiquette
Travel Insurance
bee-white Travel Insurance
Useful addresses
bee-white Useful addresses
LATEST BLOG ARTICLES

On June 7th, 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has eased travel recommendations for more than a hundred countries and territories, including Vietnam and Laos in the list of "safest to travel".

Time to travel now? We do not think so! Let's check more detail below.

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As some of you may have seen in the news, Thailand is gearing up for a ‘soft reopening’ to vaccinated travellers a month from now on July 1.

It is official, sort of. After months of kicking sand around debating if it will really happen, the Centre for Economic Situation Administration (CESA) has officially approved the Phuket Sandbox plan, an important step forward. The announcement, made late this afternoon, June, 4th, appears to answer the often-posed question if the sandbox plan would ever happen after the much more intense and deadly third wave of Covid-19 swept through Thailand.
Then, the island will be opening Phuket International Airport to foreign travellers as proposed by the Tourism Authority of Thailand.

The trial will be the first of its kind in the country, and if successful, may be rolled out across other parts of Thailand. The Thailand Authority of Tourism (TAT) has already earmarked Krabi, Pattaya, Bangkok, Buriram, Cha-am, Koh Samui, Phang-nga and Hua Hin as possible destinations to try out the scheme.

Each model will be slightly different, depending on geography, and international visitors will still have to get a visa in advance and fill out some paperwork (see details below). Nevertheless, this will come as promising news to those travellers desperate to visit Thailand!

If the Phuket Sandbox Scheme goes ahead, from June to September 2021, Thailand is expecting to receive up to 129,000 international visitors – will you be one of them? In this article, we’ll attempt to answer all of the questions you might have about the Phuket Sandbox and more!

Disclaimer – Information regarding the Phuket Sandbox Program is changing literally every day and is dependent on the COVID-19 situation across Thailand. While we update this article regularly to the best of our ability, we cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions.

Learn more about our travel guide for Phuket island here

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A playground for locals, Phnom Kulen (literally Mountain of the Lychees) is a gorgeous day out. The main attraction is the waterfalls at the top of Kulen Mountain and it’s also a great picnic spot; well set up in Cambodian style with hammocks and shelters to keep you shaded from the sun. It’s around 1.5-2 hours drive from Siem Reap and if you go all the way to the top by van or car, you need to get there early, as the road is one-way traffic only.

The birthplace of the ancient Khmer empire, it is said that it was at Phnom Kulen that King Jayavarman II proclaimed Cambodia’s independence from Java.

Additionally, it is a very sacred site with multiple temples easily accessible. Two sites most noted are the Thousand Lingas at Kbal Spean, within the Kulen National Park site and Preah Ang Thom pagoda with its giant reclining Buddha. The area is a magnet to “kru khmer” (natural medicine doctors), and attracts people seeking blessings from its holy waters, particularly the potent life-giving waters at Kbal Spean, that are said to help couples conceive.

You may be interested in Khmer Empire & Jayavarman II

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Preah Vihear Temple (Prasat Preah Vihear) is an ancient Hindu temple built during the period of the Khmer Empire, that is situated atop a 525-metre (1,722 ft) cliff in the Dângrêk Mountains, in the Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. In 1962, following a lengthy dispute between Cambodia and Thailand over ownership, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague ruled that the temple is in Cambodia.

Affording a view for many kilometers across a plain, Prasat Preah Vihear has the most spectacular setting of all the temples built during the six-century-long Khmer Empire. As a key edifice of the empire's spiritual life, it was supported and modified by successive kings and so bears elements of several architectural styles.

Preah Vihear is unusual among Khmer temples in being constructed along a long north–south axis, rather than having the conventional rectangular plan with orientation toward the east. The temple gives its name to Cambodia's Preah Vihear province, in which it is now located, as well as the Khao Phra Wihan National Park which borders it in Thailand's Sisaket province, though it is no longer accessible from Thailand.

On July 7, 2008, Preah Vihear was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Deep in the forests of Cambodia’s Siem Reap province, the elegant spires of an ancient stone city soar skyward above the sprawling complex of Angkor Archaeological Park.

The Khmer Empire’s various capitals thrived here from the 9th to 15th centuries, while their rulers presided over an empire that stretched from Myanmar (Burma) to Vietnam. Including forested areas and newly discovered “suburbs” Angkor covers more than 400 square kilometers.

Though just one of hundreds of surviving temples and structures, the massive Angkor Wat is the most famed of all Cambodia’s temples - it appears on the nation’s flag - and it is revered for good reason. The 12th century “temple-mountain” was built as a spiritual home for the Hindu god Vishnu. The temple is an architectural triumph laden with artistic treasures like the bas-relief galleries that line many walls and tell enduring tales of Cambodian history and legend.

In other parts of Angkor such art depicts scenes of daily life - offering scholars a precious window into the past.

Reading the below epic guide for Angkor Archaeological Park, you will have all the information you need from its history, maps, best time to visit and so on to have the best out of your Angkor tours

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Banteay Kdei Temple (Prasat Banteay Kdei), meaning "A Citadel of Chambers", also known as "Citadel of Monks' cells", is a Buddhist temple in Angkor, Cambodia. It is located southeast of Ta Prohm and east of Angkor Thom. 

Built in the mid-12th to early 13th centuries AD during the reign of Jayavarman VII (who was posthumously given the title "Maha paramasangata pada"), it is in the Bayon architectural style, similar in plan to Ta Prohm and Preah Khan, but less complex and smaller. Its structures are contained within two successive enclosure walls and consist of two concentric galleries from which emerge towers, preceded to the east by a cloister.

This Buddhist monastic complex is currently dilapidated due to faulty construction and poor quality of sandstone used in its buildings and is now undergoing renovation. Banteay Kdei had been occupied by monks at various intervals over the centuries till 1960s.

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